I promised I know…

07Mar08

However, Monarch, Janet’s and Adam’s good call on the bird was further established. Yesterday I caughtย her in a tree and tho I’m not sure it’s the same Varied Thrush it is a much better photograph of one. I’m pretty sure the first fellow was the male and this one is the female. It gave me a lot of hope to see her I’m hoping they are nesting somewhere around in one of the pine trees.

A photographic example of how good they are at camouflage.

Varied Thrush

I keep getting very far away shots of the Red Crossbill a female shows up in lots of photographs I take but so far the little things are so far away it’s tough to get a decent shot. I hoping for a better one but here is one of the males high up in a tree. Here is; A Cool Cornell Crossbill Fact; “The Red Crossbill is so dependent upon conifer seeds it even feeds them to its young. Consequently, it can breed any time it finds a sufficiently large cone crop, even in the depths of winter.”

Red Crossbill

And in the effort of fairness A Cool Cornell Robin Fact? “Although the appearance of a robin is considered a harbinger of spring, the American Robin actually spends the winter in much of its breeding range. However, because they spend less time in yards and congregate in large flocks during winter, you’re much less likely to see them. The number of robins present in the northern parts of the range varies each year with the local conditions.”ย 

The American Robin
robins

The few more in the rain..
robins in a tree

I also managed a better shot of the Cassin Finch. He is new to me so I’m pretty fascinated.

IMG_6139

Okay last one; and my favorite. Patch discovered sunlight again – so here he is doing exactly what babies and pups do in the sunlight they slowly nod off into slumber-land.

Patch hit with sunlight

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16 Responses to “I promised I know…”

  1. Thank you so much for the mention! ๐Ÿ˜€

    And, I agree, that first photo is much, much better. That Varied Thrush is a beautiful bird. I’m glad you mentioned that bit about Robins, I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve told folks that I have Robins almost all winter (I’ve got an ornamental crabapple tree in my front yard and, between the Robins and the Cedar Waxwings, there isn’t a single crabapple left by February at the latest) and they just look at me in disbelief! I suppose we’ve all grown up with the image of Robins hopping in manicured lawns looking for worms.

    And now, about that Crossbill … I know we’ve got them too (along the coast on Plum Island, Newburyport and on the Parker River Wildlife Refuge, Newbury) but I’ve never really seen one. I’m getting jealous! ๐Ÿ˜€

  2. Lucky you to have good views of these lovelies! Haven’t seen either a VATH or RECR in quite some time, although both do exist in San Francisco, and I’ve never seen a Cassin’s Finch, just the common House Finch & an occasional Purple Finch.

    I love how the red & black of your robins in the tree contrasts with their colorless surroundings!

  3. 3 montucky

    You are getting some really nice shots of some great birds! Very interesting!

  4. 4 zenuria

    What a beautiful dog – I adore dogs so much ๐Ÿ™‚ I know that look very well – I used to see it on the face of my beautiful canine companion before she left me. Such contentment ๐Ÿ™‚

    As ever I am in awe at your bird photos – I find them so hard to capture. And I love the colours and light in the first one.

  5. Such stunning photos and glad you were able to capture this bird again! I also love your facts that you included! BRAVO and thanks for the link!

  6. Oh my pleasure Janet – you earned it figuring it out from that far away funky shot I put up before! Just a hint really about the red cross-bill; I have only found them in two places. Pine trees very high up, they spook quite easily and on the road (I guess they also like the minerals in rocks.) p.s. I made mention of our year round robins too to a very knowledgeable fellow who pa-shawed me as well. Some rumors die hard. The second most difficult one I’ve yet to have people to believe is that hummingbirds do not migrate inside the wings of geese….who starts these ideas? ๐Ÿ™‚

  7. Hi Adam, The flock of RECR came in oddly enough on Dec 7th I didn’t post it until the 21st. They came in big time, which was a joy to watch, I’m glad a few seemed to stick around. All I can figure is we have an ample supply of pine nuts this year. ๐Ÿ™‚

  8. Thank you Montucky – once again nice kind words from a real gentleman. ๐Ÿ™‚

  9. Zenuria, Patch is my yin-yang pup. He defied death (and a shot gun blast) is extremely jealous and is my personal consistent reminder of balance. I could not imagine my life without the guy. I am a huge dog fan as well – We have three pups and all of them are spoiled hopelessly. Thank you for the honor of your visit.

  10. Oh Monarch – to be able to link to someone who is constantly in nature, is a studied biologist and works so hard to promote the importance of our winged pals is really my honor. There is not a day that I don’t learn something from your site. For anyone who has not visited – they really should. Your work shows flawlessly that there is a brilliant discovery in nature everyday.

  11. Spring is on its way! The Robin pictures turned out great along with the cross bill. Such a cute dog to!

  12. Do you know we actually had a weather man say that it was a sure sign of spring that the robins were returning from their southern winter grounds, even I am not that stupid !!

    Great shots I really like the Cassin Finch, wonderful Lori ๐Ÿ™‚

  13. Wonderful photos! I hope you will submit a post or two occasionally to Learning in the Great Outdoors, the carnival of environmental education.

    http://web.mac.com/terrellshaw/iWeb/Outdoors/

  14. It took me forever to find the bird in the first photo. SOme camouflage.

  15. These photos are so beautiful. I really love them. Especially the Robins. Wonderful. ~nita~

  16. beautiful bird shots, love the lighting on the dog photo as well


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